Kids
Kids
  • Kids
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  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline
  • Kids
    anemptytextlline

 

Children’s clothing – a topic that makes parents fun In addition to the right diet, there is hardly any topic that concerns parents as much as children’s clothing. It starts well before birth, when you first think about what the baby should wear in the first days. The baby fashion today is so diverse and so cute that it almost regrets when the child gets
older and you no longer need baby clothes. On the other hand, there are of course many more opportunities and much more to discover if you want to dress your daughter or son and this can already speak a word.

Not only the adults love to dress beautifully: Even your children know at an early age what they like to wear and what colours, shapes and brands they prefer. Of course, children’s fashion is not just about looks. Clothes for children have to survive many adventures of the little ones, such as playing and romping outdoors, and therefore not only to look smart, but also functional and, above all, comfortable.

Clothing is often made under inhumane conditions and contains harmful pollutants – including children’s clothing.

Even though children’s clothing is so cheap in many children’s clothing brands that produce sustainably, ecologically and socially make more sense for everyone involved. Because the children get poison-free clothing, the ecological materials protect the environment and the textile workers are treated fairly.

The most dangerous toxins in textiles and clothing.

The clothing labels only have to indicate which fibres have been processed. These can be both natural fibres and chemical fibres. While plants and animals supply natural raw materials such as cotton, hemp, silk or wool, manmade fibres are produced on the basis of petroleum products (eg polyester and polyacrylic) or cellulose (eg viscose and acetate). More than half of the processed fibres are synthetic fibres and about one third are cotton fibres.

Many people think that clothing made from natural fibres poses no danger. Unfortunately, that is not the case. For if the contained toxins had to be declared, the label would probably be larger than the garment itself – regardless of whether the clothing made of natural or synthetic fibres. The EU has already banned or set limits on some of the toxins for textiles, but even these rules apply only to the textile industry in the EU, but not to imported clothing.

Kids

Children’s clothing – a topic that makes parents fun In addition to the right diet, there is hardly any topic that concerns parents as much as children’s clothing. It starts well before birth, when you first think about what the baby should wear in the first days. The baby fashion today is so diverse and so cute that it almost regrets when the child gets
older and you no longer need baby clothes. On the other hand, there are of course many more opportunities and much more to discover if you want to dress your daughter or son and this can already speak a word.

Not only the adults love to dress beautifully: Even your children know at an early age what they like to wear and what colours, shapes and brands they prefer. Of course, children’s fashion is not just about looks. Clothes for children have to survive many adventures of the little ones, such as playing and romping outdoors, and therefore not only to look smart, but also functional and, above all, comfortable.

Clothing is often made under inhumane conditions and contains harmful pollutants – including children’s clothing.

Even though children’s clothing is so cheap in many children’s clothing brands that produce sustainably, ecologically and socially make more sense for everyone involved. Because the children get poison-free clothing, the ecological materials protect the environment and the textile workers are treated fairly.

The most dangerous toxins in textiles and clothing.

The clothing labels only have to indicate which fibres have been processed. These can be both natural fibres and chemical fibres. While plants and animals supply natural raw materials such as cotton, hemp, silk or wool, manmade fibres are produced on the basis of petroleum products (eg polyester and polyacrylic) or cellulose (eg viscose and acetate). More than half of the processed fibres are synthetic fibres and about one third are cotton fibres.

Many people think that clothing made from natural fibres poses no danger. Unfortunately, that is not the case. For if the contained toxins had to be declared, the label would probably be larger than the garment itself – regardless of whether the clothing made of natural or synthetic fibres. The EU has already banned or set limits on some of the toxins for textiles, but even these rules apply only to the textile industry in the EU, but not to imported clothing.